• Ali Assareh

We often ask, or are asked, to "lead more". But what does that exactly mean?

We often ask, or are asked, to "lead more". But what does that exactly mean?


Especially in the context of asking for a promotion, and corporate life generally, you may find "lead more" to be vague.


Below is a simple model Masayo Nobe and I developed to help break it down, especially for more junior colleagues. (The first iteration was on the back of a napkin at an Italian restaurant in Manhattan Beach -- our first real date since baby Issa!)


Reading from the bottom up:


- We assumed that a core skill of leadership is the ability to execute what is asked of you.


- At the base level, you should be able to execute that task flawlessly (i.e., find and fix typos before you get the doc signed).


- Next level up, you should execute and conduct some basic due diligence (i.e., Are there other docs that need to be signed too?)


- Next level up, you should execute and catch red flags (i.e., I was asked to get her signature, but she has no authority to sign!)


- Next level up, you should execute and catch yellow flags (i.e., She has authority to sign now, but I know she's leaving the company in 2 weeks!)


- Next level up, you should execute but speak up if you disagree with an aspect of the request (i.e., You asked me to do X, but I think we need to do X minus Y because blah blah).


- Next level up, you are not even asked to execute: you find existing gaps to fix, proactively (i.e., You didn't ask me to do X, but X is a pain point for our company, so here's my plan to fix it).


- Next level up, you don't just fix existing gaps: you look around corners and anticipate / avoid / address future potential issues. YOU CREATE VALUE OUT OF NOTHING.


As you move up the ladder, you must build skills like cross-functional collaboration, team-building, and management in parallel.




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